Five Albums That Changed My Life

There was a twitter trend last week called #3AlbumsThatChangedMyLife, and this got me thinking about all of the music that I’ve listened to over the past few years that’s played a formative role in the person I am today (spoiler alert: there’s a lot). And seeing as there’s only so much you can say in 140 characters, I thought I’d expand on my top 5 picks here (yes I couldn’t narrow it down to three), in no particular order, of course.

 

Folie a Deux – Fall Out Boy

“I’m coming apart at the seams, pitching myself for leads in other people’s dreams”

One of my most listened to albums of all time, a perfect mixture of styles that has an almost soul crushingly accurate song for every possible mood. From jumping up and down in that defiantly teenage way to the tune of ‘I Don’t Care’, to crying in the bath on a Sunday night to ‘What A Catch Donnie’, all bases really are covered here. The only problem I have here is that they very rarely play any of these songs live, but I supposed with six studio albums, you can’t get around to everything.

 

Pure Heroine – Lorde

“Call all the ladies out, they’re in their finery, a hundred jewels on throats, a hundred jewels between teeth”

Lorde is probably my number one inspiration in life, because she has such a beautiful artistic brain, and she uses it flawlessly to create the aesthetic of this album, which is dark, moody and strikingly visual. It’s rare that a ten track album can create such a lasting impact, but this is one that I find myself coming back to again and again, looking for those familiar places and feelings between the sound and the lyric that Lorde creates for you.

 

Art Angels – Grimes

“If you’re looking for a dream girl, I’ll never be your dream girl”

One of the greatest live performances I ever saw was Grimes at Manchester Academy in March, on tour with this album, and that no doubt contributed even further to my love of it. It’s an intense, emotional rollercoaster of an album, full of tracks to rage to, like Kill v. Maim and SCREAM, interspersed with more crafted and reflective songs, like Butterfly and Realiti, which I’m loving listening to on the way to Uni at the moment. I guess all in all, this album has just been the soundtrack to my emotions this last year.

 

Every Open Eye – Chvrches

“A lifeline to highs and lows, to seeing the bright side, and I should know”

Much like Art Angels, this album too has been one that has dragged me through so many stages of emotion; from anger, to regret, to acceptance, and all the shades in between. Lauren Mayberry’s voice is angelic, and perfect for every effortlessly poetic lyric that carries the album from start to finish. Synth pop is something that I’ve only recently become a fan of, but now I find that I’m searching for it everywhere, and that’s all thanks to this album.

 

What Did You Expect From The Vaccines? – The Vaccines

“We all got old at breakneck speed, slow it down, go easy on me”

One of my first gigs I’ve ever attended was The Vaccines at the Apollo in Manchester, and although it was rowdy and a bit scary and I was only fourteen, I still carry so many fond memories of it. This album in particular, strikes me both with nostalgia and with overwhelming love, as it has stayed so relevant in my life. Arguably the best balance of songs both long and short, reflective and house party worthy, it is no doubt an album that I will take with me wherever I end up.

Jennie Atherton

Jennie is Music Editor for The Atlas Times. She can be found on Twitter; @Jennie_Atherton.


2 Responses

  1. widnesian says:

    It’s great to read you again, and even more pleased was I to note that I have three of the albums in this top five, but I’m not gonna tell you which ones so you won’t judge me. This is a wonderful piece and I should personally like to recommend a really good synthpop song to you, and one of my favourites, if I may. it’s by a group called Hard Corps and it came out in 1985, years before you arrived. It’s called Je Suis Passee, and if you sift around a bit you may find the version that singer Regine sings in her native French, so you can brush up on the lingo whilst bopping about to the cool tune at the same time! How much fun is that? Welcome back!

    • Jennie Atherton Jennie Atherton says:

      Thank you Tony 🙂 I’ll give that song a listen, and I’ve got a couple more articles in the works, so look out for those too!

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